Vet Tech Schools In Pennsylvania

How To Become A Vet Tech In Pennsylvania

Happy golden retriever dog with vegetablesIf you have decided to become a veterinary technician in Pennsylvania, then you must understand that the only way to be eligible for the final national exam is by enrolling in a vet tech program offered by a fully accredited school. Nowadays, most colleges that offer in-depth training for veterinary technicians are accredited by AVMA, but when making your choice is important to pay attention to other aspects in addition to the accreditation. With that in mind, it is important to check the admissions and the graduation rates, the curriculum, the facilities, the outcomes assessment as well as the available resources and the library.

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Programs:

AVMA only offers accreditation to schools that meet a set of very rigorous criteria, as it is dedicated to helping veterinary technicians get out of schools ready for practice right away. That being said, after graduation it is important to consult with the State Board of Veterinary Medicine in order to find out more information on licensure, and only those who pass the veterinary technician test can apply for a licensure. Those who do get a licensure in Pennsylvania must renew it on a constant basis, and in order for that to happen the technicians must have a number of 16 hours of continuing education in the state.

Vet Tech Schools In Pennsylvania

There is a number of veterinary technician schools in Pennsylvania that are accredited by the AVMA or the American Veterinary Medical Association. One of the most reputable state universities that is not only fully accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association but that also offers vet techs the possibility to pursue an Associate’s of Science Degree in the field is the Harcum College, followed by the Veterinary Technician Institute which is located in Pittsburgh. This one also has full AVMA accreditation and so does the Manor College – the Manor College has a Veterinary Technician training program that was accredited more than two decades ago, and that has delivered hundreds of skilled veterinary technicians over the years. The Manor College and the Wilson College are actually two of the most reputable institutions in the state of Pennsylvania when it comes to vet tech training, and the latter offers students a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Veterinary Technology.

Veterinary Technician Career Description

Becoming a veterinary technician can take two or more years of study and hard work, but the final results will certainly pay off. In a nutshell, vet techs are to veterinarians exactly as nurses are to doctors – a veterinarian would be unable to work efficiently without the help of a skilled, trustworthy, experienced and reliable veterinary technician on his side. It must be said that these days, vet techs deal with a plethora of vet-related and administrative tasks – not only do they schedule appointments and assist the doctor in surgery, but he also talks directly to customers and to pet owners, trying to raise awareness about certain conditions.

Pennsylvania

On a typical day, a veterinary technician can take and then develop the x-rays, can record case histories, can diagnose and then treat a variety of medical diseases and conditions, as well as perform different medical tests on the animal patients, tests that can vary all the way from drawing blood to be sent over to the laboratory for analysis, to preparing tissue samples. Moreover, vet techs also provide high-quality nursing care and they administer topical and oral medications exactly as prescribed by the veterinary – these technicians also assist the oral surgeons with various dental procedures performed on the animal patients, and they might also have to euthanize the seriously injured or the terminally ill animal patients.

Salary and Career Info

The interactive chart above is a visual representation of the annual salary of Pennsylvania veterinary technicians compared to the national annual salaries, all based on the latest May 2013 Occupational Employment Statistics figures released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Veterinary Technician Certification In Pennsylvania

In Pennsylvania, certified vet techs are commonly referred to as CVTs, which means that they are slightly different from registered or licensed veterinary technicians. While in the State of New York, VTs are required to become licensed in order to work legally, in the state of Pennsylvania they will have to become certified. The main requirement is completing an AVMA accredited vet tech training program, and then to sit and pass the vet tech national exam. Once they get their certifications, veterinary technicians will need to re-take the certification exam once every 24 months, in order to constantly renew their credentials, as required by the Pennsylvania state.